Connie Nielsen as Karen Blixen in Upcoming Danish Mini-Series”The Dreamer”

A quick post on Connie Nielsen portraying Karen Blixen in an upcoming Danish mini-series.

Karen Blixen and (possibly) Denys Finch-Hatton in the 1920’s

If you are a fan of the Danish actress Connie Nielsen or the Danish writer Karen Blixen (on whose experiences the movie Out of Africa was based, follow this link to an article, “MIPTV: Connie Nielsen on Becoming Karen Blixen in ‘The Dreamer'” by Scott Roxborough. The article discusses the challenges Nielsen faced in portraying Karen Blixen and how her portrayal differs radically from that by Meryl Streep in Out of Africa. Streep’s portrayal was of a young woman engaged in a passionate love affair, whereas Nielsen’s is that of a broken woman who has returned to Denmark penniless having lost her farm and her lover.

One note about the photo above: in trying to find a photo to accompany this article, I ran across this one. There are two copies of this photo on Wikimedia Commons. One identifies the man as Denys Finch-Hatton, (Blixen’s lover portrayed by Robert Redford in Out of Africa). Another identifies the man as Thomas Dinesen, Karen’s brother. Its source is supposed to be the Danish Royal Library. The source of the first is not identified. However, a quick search on Google resulted in a lot of photos of Denys Finch-Hatton, most of which (in my opinion) look like the man above. If you enjoy detective work, do the research and let me know what you come up with.

Hasta luego.

Lycanthrope: Update of April 5, 2022

An update on my progress with Lycanthrope.

One theoretical cover

I have finally broken through the barrier that has kept me from adding more to Lycanthrope. I still have more to go, but I am probably at about 67,000 of a desired 80,000+ words. I am coming up with some good ideas, but I must jot them down quickly or I forget them. Hopefully, I will be finished before long. I am focused on finishing this finally. It has been a long journey and the storyline is radically different from the original I imagined nearly thirty years ago when I was in the Navy and living in Bremerton, Washington.

I find that the best way to come up with ideas is by sitting down in the chair at the computer and just staring into the distance until an idea surfaces. A lot of times though, the trick seems to be to go to bed after having thought about the story throughout the day or at least just before going to bed. The ideas seem to just leap into my head at moments like those. Then I scrounge up some scrap paper or an old envelope on the shelves next to the bed and jot down all I can. Sometimes, to get paper and pen, I have to go into the adjacent living room. A lot of times, this seems to happen when I am tired. Sometimes, I just act out what the character is doing or maybe I just take a break and do something out of the norm and then I can imagine the character doing the same. For example, I took a break from writing late one night and, after grabbing a bottle of vodka, walked out to the empty highway running through the woods in front of my house. I live in a remote area, so I didn’t have to worry about any traffic at all. I then walked up and down the centerline looking at the moon and stars and sometimes going into the pitch dark section of the road running under the canopy of the woods. I had one or two swigs out of the bottle, but nothing to even give me a buzz. It was a neat moment and I did see a few shooting stars. However, when I got back to the house, I had the protagonist do the same, but I embellished it considerably as he thought of the nature of the world and universe while getting quite drunk. Trying to find his way back to his house, he bumps into a tree and falls to the ground, where he sleeps until his girlfriend comes looking for him and drags him back to the house, scolding him all the way. I think this scene turned out to be a very nice passage and I think I wrote it quite beautifully and poignantly.

When I first started writing the story in Bremerton, I envisioned the story as something much more conventional than I have now. Set in the forests and hamlets surrounding Bremerton, the idea was about a man who had become a werewolf and was the narrator as he watched the police get ever closer to finding out who he was. There is a lot of magick and fantasy added to the current story and it is set in another state. I am hoping the story ends up a lot more intense than my original concept.

I will write more updates as time permits. Now, I need to go grab some supper and get to writing again.

Hasta luego.

“A Tale of Hell…” Nice Write-up on Barnes & Noble

Barnes & Noble has a nice write-up on A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror.

I was surfing the Internet tonight and I was pleasantly surprised to find that Barnes & Noble has done a nice write-up on A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror. They apparently went to a little effort to nicely copy the Overview, Editorial Reviews, and even my bio notes from the information I provided to IngramSpark and format them beautifully. I haven’t garnered any reviews of it on Barnes & Noble yet, so if you have read ATOH, please provide one either on the Barnes & Noble site or somewhere on the Internet. Visit the Barnes & Noble page when you can.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

This is a reprint of an article that originally appeared on August 25, 2021.

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

This is a reprint of an article that originally appeared on August 25, 2021.

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

This is a reprint of an article that originally appeared on August 25, 2021.

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

This is a reprint of an article that originally appeared on August 25, 2021.

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Update: The Chamber Gift Shop and Cover Art

Yesterday, I remodeled, so to speak, the Chamber Gift shop by eliminating all the dozens of individual items and installing six collections, which is a feature Zazzle has, in which merchandise is grouped around a theme…

Yesterday, I remodeled, so to speak, the Chamber Gift shop by eliminating all the dozens of individual items and installing six collections, which is a feature Zazzle has, in which merchandise is grouped around a theme. Now instead of having to scroll though scores of individual objects, a reader can choose one of the six collections (The Chamber Magazine Collection, Famous Authors Collection, Quotes from the Darkness Collection, Cyberpunk Collection, Steampunk Collection, and The Dark Collection) and go directly to the page for that them. Alternatively, he/she can just follow the link in read above the collections to the homepage of the The Chamber’s Zazzle page and peruse everything.

I also added a block below the collections to my books (both fiction and blank notebooks/ journals) on Pinterest. Clicking on a book will take you to the Pinterest entry on that book. Click on the Pinterest image and you will be taken to the Amazon page for that book, where it can be purchased. This is just a short, easy way for visitors to see the works available and to go to Amazon while I develop something a little grander and easier to use.

I also took all of The Chamber’s cover art, which is that widget in the upper right of the website, and collected it onto another page. Although I have fun creating these covers, it does take some time and effort and I hate to see each of these viewed by the public for only a week or two and then to disappear forever. So, I put them all in one page, which I will update periodically. I also linked this page to The Chamber, so they can be found there also.

Hopefully, I will be making a few more changes soon.

A Tale of Hell Now Available at Your Local Bookstore by Print on Demand.

As of October 23, 2020, A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror is being printed and distributed by IngramSpark. With their immense distribution network of over 39,000 retailers, A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror is now available by print on demand. Be sure to ask for it at your local book retailer. It will continue to be sold via Amazon in Kindle and in print (though the IngramSpark version will be much nicer).

In this collection of published and previously unpublished stories of horror, I take you on a journey into the minds of people who perpetrate horrors, from acts of stupidity with unintended results to cold-hearted revenge to pure enjoyment to complete indifference. Settings range from 17th-century France in the heart of the werewolf trials to the Old West to the present and on to alien worlds in the distant future. Order yours today!

A Tale of Hell Now Available at Your Local Bookstore by Print on Demand.

As of October 23, 2020, A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror is being printed and distributed by IngramSpark. With their immense distribution network of over 39,000 retailers, A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror is now available by print on demand. Be sure to ask for it at your local book retailer. It will continue to be sold via Amazon in Kindle and in print (though the IngramSpark version will be much nicer).

In this collection of published and previously unpublished stories of horror, I take you on a journey into the minds of people who perpetrate horrors, from acts of stupidity with unintended results to cold-hearted revenge to pure enjoyment to complete indifference. Settings range from 17th-century France in the heart of the werewolf trials to the Old West to the present and on to alien worlds in the distant future. Order yours today!

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste. All submissions must be in English. However, an accompanying translation in any other language is permitted.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 7,500 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

Update on Shadows and Stars

Over the last couple weeks, I have had a bit of writer’s block on Lycanthrope, so I decided to start working again on Shadows and Stars. However, I have been stumped on where to pick up with that.

Character from Shadows and Stars

Over the last couple weeks, I have had a bit of writer’s block on Lycanthrope, so I decided to start working again on Shadows and Stars. However, I have been stumped on where to pick up with that. As you may recall, I stopped editing Shadows and Stars, because coordinating and double-checking all the details in a 150,000+ word novel was becoming overwhelming. Meanwhile, I was getting one idea after another for Lycanthrope.

So, for a few weeks I have worked on neither and instead focused all my energy on building The Chamber Magazine, for which I have had ideas pouring in. Now, I am at a decent point with that, so I have been wanting to pick up on Shadows and Stars, which is what happened last night.

You may know from earlier posts, that I love to sit in a restaurant or coffee shop and write my manuscripts by hand in a journal or notebook. Since the start of the Pandemic, I have rarely been in a restaurant and never to simply sit and write. Yesterday, I got a haircut in Dumas. Because the pandemic restrictions are easing and I have had both doses of the Pfizer vaccine, I decided to go to one of my favorite Mexican restaurants, El Toro in Dumas, to write.

I wrote only for maybe an hour and a half, but it was so enjoyable. I felt at home and the ideas for Shadows and Stars flowed like in old times in Farmington. I made some important decisions and refined some plot elements, so that I no longer have the block I did when I took up Lycanthrope. I hope to be working more on Shadows and Stars tonight. It’s a beautiful, picture perfect day here with an absolutely perfectly comfortable temperature.

One idea I had yesterday evening for spurring creativity derived from my branding and advertising for The Chamber. You may have noticed that I love to use eye-grabbing, attention-snagging graphics in The Chamber. Most I use over and over for different tasks. You may also have noticed that I like to have a little fun and put a little fun into The Chamber as well. For that reason, I took some of the graphics I was using and created an imaginary staff with some interesting names and backgrounds suitable for a dark magazine like The Chamber. I reuse some of these graphics enough that for quick reference, I think of them by the names I gave them in the staff photos section. So, instead of thinking, “where’s that photo of the girl leaning on a door with the red tattoos running from the ends of her mouth, across her cheeks, and through her eyes, I simply think, “Where’s Orly?”

Anyway, I have been struggling with what happens when my Shadows and Stars protagonist, Daryn, wanders into an industrial city called Katliam. It has been a lot harder for me to visualize Katliam than it is for me to visualize Janhalo, the main city in the story. I have also been trying to come up with the types of characters he encounters there, but I keep drawing a blank.

Then I thought why not use Pexels and Pixabay (the two main websites I use for photos for The Chamber and elsewhere) to help stimulate some ideas.

So, I went to those and I searched for the strangest, alien-looking people I could find. Now, I can visualize some of these characters interacting with the characters I have already created to come up with new subplots and interactions. It’s already giving me some ideas. I took the images I chose and stored them on my hard drive for reference. I used one of them for the image at the top of this post. I can now look at a character and invent a background for him like Professor Tripp and his editor, Crabs, did in the bar in the movie Wonder Boys. This happens to be a game my wife and I used to play while sitting in a night club when we started dating. However, we were trying to figure out the person’s actual background from their appearance (so we were more like Holmes and Watson).

Now talking about this gives me an idea for a game which might generate more publicity for The Chamber. I can put up a photo of someone and ask people to give a quick bio. Writers like to make up characters. I think I would post in The Chamber’s blog, so that it goes out to other social media simultaneously or I might just tinker with it on Twitter first. I think I will do that and then move it to the blog if I get a good response. I will do that now..

As mentioned, I have been doing a lot with The Chamber over the last few weeks. I will have to write maybe several posts on that covering a variety of topics from being an editor to planning marketing and trying to come up with ideas for grabbing some publicity. I am not dropping that by any stretch of the imagination. I have got it to a point now that I can manage it at my leisure. One reason for this is that I now have enough submissions that I have been able to plan out and schedule the issues to mid-June. Now, I can take off for a month if I like then come back and pick up where I left off without interrupting the flow of the magazine. I am making use of Buffer.com and capabilities in WordPress and Twitter to play my posts as far in advance as possible.

Anyway, that’s all I care to write for today. Stand by for more updates in the weeks ahead.

Hasta luego.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste. All submissions must be in English. However, an accompanying translation in any other language is permitted.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.

The Chamber Magazine is Seeking Dark Fiction and Poetry from Around the World

The Chamber Magazine is seeking articles, reviews, essays, poems, and short stories of approximately 5,000 words (more or less) including flash, micro fiction, smoke longs, drabbles or of any flavor of short fiction that demonstrates the art of writing dark fiction, whether it be prose, poetry, one-act plays, or any other form of literature.  We want to showcase the genre in all its subtlety, intelligence, art, horror, terror, suspense, thrill-seeking, and gruesome detail. We will accept dark humor provided it follows the guidelines below with regards to content and good taste.

To be good short fiction, the shorter a work is, the more power it must pack.

There is no pay for publication, but the author retains all rights. Reprints are acceptable. Multiple submissions of up to three works per submission are permitted. Simultaneous submissions are permitted, but you must tell us if the work has been accepted elsewhere. We usually respond within a week. Works generally appear a month after acceptance.

More details about submissions are available on the website.

Send submissions and queries to thechambermagazine@gmail.com.