Update November 15: Batesville Comic-con Invitation

At Arkansas Post 2020

This weekend I was invited to speak at the Batesville (Arkansas) High School ComicCon March 4-5. I will be speaking on my writing and on The Chamber Magazine and my second publishing endeavor, Rural Fiction Magazine. I will provide more details as I learn them and as I develop my talks.

Being invited to the ComicCon was a pleasant surprise. This is the first time I have been invited anywhere to speak on my writing. I am flattered.

I am looking forward to this opportunity to speak about three of my favorite passions.

More to come. Stay tuned.

Update November 13, 2021: Progressing on Lycanthrope

I am trying to come up with ideas on how to conclude Lycanthrope. I think focusing more on developing the protagonist’s (Peter’s) character through interior monologue would help not only reveal more of his nature, particularly through showing his perspective on the world, but would help generate more ideas on how to wrap up the book.

As I surfing YouTube last night, I came upon a one-man, one-act play version of Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground starring Larry Cedar as the collegiate assessor. Excellent production. This is the kind of interior monologue I am talking about.

I have started to read Notes from Underground several times, but never could finish it before being pulled off onto something else. I am enjoying this production. It seems to be holding true to the text as I recall it, though, of course, this production is a severely abridged version of the novel. Any audiobook version of Notes… lasts about five hours, whereas the stage production lasts about 90 minutes. I enjoy productions like this one, set in the appropriate period, because they help me visualize the events. I still need to sit down and read the novel through in one sitting though to appreciate it as it was intended to be appreciated.

However, I do find Cedar’s interpretation of the collegiate assessor fascinating. I like his active acting style. Though I am not an actor (though I have one or two WIP’s that are plays), his technique seems ideal for the stage and particularly for a one-man show, which demands that the protagonist keep the audience riveted. Some people may consider it somewhat melodramatic, but I would disagree. I think it is ideal for the play and for expressing what is going on in the characters’ minds. I recommend watching this production to anyone, particularly to those with an interest in 19th century Russian literature.

Going to his YouTube page, I see that Larry Cedars has several similar one-act plays to be viewed, including at least one based on one of Kafka’s work. I will make it a point to watch as many of these as I can.

Rural Fiction Magazine is now Accepting Submissions

Slattery Publishing’s latest endeavor, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM), is now accepting submissions. Detailed guidelines can be found on RFM’s Submissions Page.

Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is seeking mainstream and/or literary fiction and poetry that explores the beauty and drama of rural life on both an emotional and intellectual level. That said, RFM is willing to look at any other genre (horror, fantasy, noir, mystery, thriller, adventure, etc.) so long as it has a rural setting and addresses topics or themes of interest to people in rural areas. For that matter, although RFM expects the vast majority of submissions to be set in the US, but we are not adverse to seeing works set in rural areas of other nations. Remember, this is going out over the Internet. People all over the world will be able to read the stories published here, be they from Canada, England, Mexico, Tahiti, Japan, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, or wherever.

For the foreseeable future, RFM will be a monthly, online-only magazine publishing on the first of each month. The deadline for submissions is one week before the publication date. Anything received after that will be considered for the next issue.

Rural Fiction Magazine is now Accepting Submissions

Slattery Publishing’s latest endeavor, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM), is now accepting submissions. Detailed guidelines can be found on RFM’s Submissions Page.

Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is seeking mainstream and/or literary fiction and poetry that explores the beauty and drama of rural life on both an emotional and intellectual level. That said, RFM is willing to look at any other genre (horror, fantasy, noir, mystery, thriller, adventure, etc.) so long as it has a rural setting and addresses topics or themes of interest to people in rural areas. For that matter, although RFM expects the vast majority of submissions to be set in the US, but we are not adverse to seeing works set in rural areas of other nations. Remember, this is going out over the Internet. People all over the world will be able to read the stories published here, be they from Canada, England, Mexico, Tahiti, Japan, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, or wherever.

For the foreseeable future, RFM will be a monthly, online-only magazine publishing on the first of each month. The deadline for submissions is one week before the publication date. Anything received after that will be considered for the next issue.

Rural Fiction Magazine is now Accepting Submissions

Slattery Publishing’s latest endeavor, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM), is now accepting submissions. Detailed guidelines can be found on RFM’s Submissions Page.

Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is seeking mainstream and/or literary fiction and poetry that explores the beauty and drama of rural life on both an emotional and intellectual level. That said, RFM is willing to look at any other genre (horror, fantasy, noir, mystery, thriller, adventure, etc.) so long as it has a rural setting and addresses topics or themes of interest to people in rural areas. For that matter, although RFM expects the vast majority of submissions to be set in the US, but we are not adverse to seeing works set in rural areas of other nations. Remember, this is going out over the Internet. People all over the world will be able to read the stories published here, be they from Canada, England, Mexico, Tahiti, Japan, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, or wherever.

For the foreseeable future, RFM will be a monthly, online-only magazine publishing on the first of each month. The deadline for submissions is one week before the publication date. Anything received after that will be considered for the next issue.

Rural Fiction Magazine is now Accepting Submissions

Slattery Publishing’s latest endeavor, Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM), is now accepting submissions. Detailed guidelines can be found on RFM’s Submissions Page.

Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM) is seeking mainstream and/or literary fiction and poetry that explores the beauty and drama of rural life on both an emotional and intellectual level. That said, RFM is willing to look at any other genre (horror, fantasy, noir, mystery, thriller, adventure, etc.) so long as it has a rural setting and addresses topics or themes of interest to people in rural areas. For that matter, although RFM expects the vast majority of submissions to be set in the US, but we are not adverse to seeing works set in rural areas of other nations. Remember, this is going out over the Internet. People all over the world will be able to read the stories published here, be they from Canada, England, Mexico, Tahiti, Japan, Malaysia, Uzbekistan, or wherever.

For the foreseeable future, RFM will be a monthly, online-only magazine publishing on the first of each month. The deadline for submissions is one week before the publication date. Anything received after that will be considered for the next issue.

New Policy

From now on, I am not deciding which submissions will be published after thee glasses of Cabernet. I have had no problems yet and I intend not to make any.