Fiction from “The Drabble”: “Sleep on Needles” by Intrudesite

Slattery's note:  This is not what most would consider "horror" per se, but the ending has such a chilling quality that might bring it into the realm of horror ultra-lite. ### By intrudesite She was just a baby when they diagnosed her with acute leukemia. She did not understand all the words, she feared the … Continue reading Fiction from “The Drabble”: “Sleep on Needles” by Intrudesite

Physical Descriptions and the Atmosphere of the Mind

I was sitting here writing a short story when it occurred to me that most characters in classic fiction seldom have detailed descriptions of their physical characteristics.  In fact, many have none at all.   If they are described, it is usually in a broad, general way, unless there is some detail the author wants to … Continue reading Physical Descriptions and the Atmosphere of the Mind

Observations on “Baby Shoes” and Hemingway’s Iceberg Principle

There is a story that Ernest Hemingway wrote the following to win a bet with other writers that he could write the shortest story: "For sale:  baby shoes.  Never worn." Even a little research on the Internet shows that there is considerable doubt that Hemingway wrote this story, with the earliest reference to it as … Continue reading Observations on “Baby Shoes” and Hemingway’s Iceberg Principle

Stephen King, H.P. Lovecraft, and the X-files

I just finished watching an episode of the X-Files entitled "Chinga" [note to Spanish-speakers out there:  I don't know who chose the title, so please forgive my language] from Season Five and I  noticed that it was written by Stephen King and Chris Carter (the creator of the X-Files).  The story's antagonist is a talking doll that … Continue reading Stephen King, H.P. Lovecraft, and the X-files

Notes on “The Hellbound Heart” Part 2 of 2

I finished reading The Hellbound Heart several weeks ago.  As noted previously, it is a truly terrific read.    I suggest reading it after seeing the movie (if you have somehow repeatedly missed your chances of seeing "Hellraiser" over the last twenty or so years).   Reading it beforehand will just spoil the movie, whereas reading it afterwards may enlighten parts … Continue reading Notes on “The Hellbound Heart” Part 2 of 2

Visit “The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Volume 1” but not for the obvious reason.

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Volume 1.  Yes, this link takes you to a collection of Poe's works, but the reason I am mentioning it here is because the preface to this particular volume includes fascinating biographical notes and insight into the character of this master of horror that may help you understand the roots … Continue reading Visit “The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Volume 1” but not for the obvious reason.

Impressions of Five Writing Styles

I was in the Farmington public library yesterday trying to pull together some ideas for a story, but I could not concentrate long enough to formulate many good thoughts, because I felt more in a mood to receive information rather than to transmit. Within the last few days I have started reading a collection of Lovecraft stories … Continue reading Impressions of Five Writing Styles

Recommendation: The Popular Uncanny

I found a fascinating article just now that I highly recommend visiting:  "Winter Chills with Mike Arnzen".  You can find it at http://nonhorrorreadersurvey.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/winter-chills-with-mike-arnzen/.  It is a fascinating look into how Freud's concept of the Uncanny can be found in modern horror and in popular culture.    It is worth checking out.

What music inspires you to horror?

For the first time in a long time, I was listening to CDs on the car stereo as I drove back from Farmington (New Mexico) on the 14th, when I started feeling once again the latent but powerful emotions I associate with certain songs.  The songs in question were Puddle of Mudd's "Spaceship" from Songs in the Key of Love and Hate and … Continue reading What music inspires you to horror?

Lovecraft on the Supernatural

  I was reading Lovecraft's "Supernatural Horror in Literature" the other day when I came across this line concerning the nature of  the "weird tale": "A certain atmosphere of breathless and unexplainable dread of outer, unknown forces must be present; and there must be a hint, expressed with a seriousness and protentiousness becoming its subject, … Continue reading Lovecraft on the Supernatural

Jorge Oscar Rossi’s “Archetypal Horror: H.P. Lovecraft and Carl Gustav Jung”

I ran across an interesting article today at http://www.quintadimension.com/article66.html, entitled "Archetypal Horror:  H.P. Lovecraft and Carl Gustav Jung".  It was written by Jorge Oscar Rossi, an Argentinian writer of science fiction (and fantastic literature in general), and published on December, 8, 2000.  Please note that the article and his autobiography are in Spanish. I am no master of … Continue reading Jorge Oscar Rossi’s “Archetypal Horror: H.P. Lovecraft and Carl Gustav Jung”