Great Authors Err Too! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

Quintilian, Inst. Orat. 10.1.24-26 “Let the reader not be persuaded as a matter of course that everything the best authors said is perfect. For they slip at times, they give in to their burdens, and…

Quintilian, Inst. Orat. 10.1.24-26 “Let the reader not be persuaded as a matter of course that everything the best authors said is perfect. For they slip at times, they give in to their burdens, and they delight in the pleasure of their own abilities. They do not always pay attention; and they often grow tired. Demosthenes…

Great Authors Err Too! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow … —

By Michael Mitchell The librarian takes Banquo’s order for a copy of Macbeth and goes out to the back room. Says he has started the process. “Try next week.” Next week Banquo follows up. He contemplates the back room, full of monkeys pounding away at typewriters, wall to wall. The librarian smiles and shakes his […]

Tomorrow, and Tomorrow, and Tomorrow … —

How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare – by Megan McCluskey… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

on Time Magazine: A few months after posting a message on Goodreads about the imminent release of a new book, Indie author Beth Black woke up to an all-caps ransom email from an anonymous server, demanding that she either pay for good reviews or have her books inundated with negative ones: “EITHER YOU TAKE CARE […]

How Extortion Scams and Review Bombing Trolls Turned Goodreads Into Many Authors’ Worst Nightmare – by Megan McCluskey… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

Writing Unorthodox Relationships #Writing #Author #Advice — James Harringtons Creative Work

Hi Jim, I have a rather unusual one for you. I’m trying to write a romance story dealing with two completely different species. However one of the characters who is going to be part of the relationship is only about 13 years old. Her race essentially reaches maturity at six years old, though […]

Writing Unorthodox Relationships #Writing #Author #Advice — James Harringtons Creative Work

How an editor at a publisher acquires a book – by Christine Pride… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

on Nathan Bransford: Greetings writerly people! I’m so happy to be here in this great community my friend Nathan has built to offer semi-regular posts about the publishing industry. For the last two decades, I’ve worked as a book editor at various Big Five houses, as a freelance editor and ghostwriter, and in October will […]

How an editor at a publisher acquires a book – by Christine Pride… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

Appearing in The Chamber on August 27

Here’s what’s going on over at The Chamber.

The Chamber Magazine

New issues appear Fridays at 10:00 a.m. CDT/ 4:00 p.m. BST/ 8:30 p.m. IST/ 1:00 a.m. AEST (Saturdays).

“Last Chance Cabin” Fiction by John Ryland

John Ryland has published work in Eldritch Journal, Otherwise Engaged, The Writer’s Magazine, Birmingham Arts Journal, Subterranean Blue, and others. His collection Southern Gothic and novel Souls Harbor are currently available on all major markets. His upcoming novel The Man with No Eyes, will be published by Moonshine Cove Press in March 2022.”

“Nocturnal” Poem by Todd Matson

Todd Matson is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He has written poetry for The Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling, has been published in Ariel Chart International Literary Journal, Bluepepper, and The Chamber Magazine, and has written lyrics for songs recorded by a number of contemporary Christian music artists.

“Seven Urns” Fiction by Hayden Sidun

Hayden Sidun is a high school student whose short…

View original post 162 more words

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

Rural Fiction Magazine is Now Accepting Submissions

Phil Slattery portrait
Phil Slattery March, 2015

Because I currently live in a rural area, I have decided to experiment with opening another magazine: Rural Fiction Magazine. The idea came to me while I was driving to the pharmacy in the nearby (about 17 miles from my residence) town of Dumas.

While I enjoy immensely working with The Chamber Magazine, it does have a disadvantage or two. The primary disadvantage is that the local populace does not seem to be made up of the type of people that are drawn to dark fiction. But then, can you name a community that is drawn to dark fiction? To me, they seem more the type of people who would be drawn to mainstream or literary fiction, particularly that with a bent toward farm life, agriculture, hunting, etc.

Yes, I am living in the Bible belt. The nearby (five miles from my residence) town of Gillett has a population of 700 and five rather nice churches. I don’t expect a lot of horror and thriller fans live there.

Then it struck me that maybe I should try to start a magazine centered around farm life.

I grew up in a rural area in Kentucky, so I have the background for it. I am not a big farming enthusiast however. My family had small farms as sidelines back in the day to bolster the income from their standard, 40 hours/week, blue collar jobs.

Besides working with my dad and occasionally relatives in their gardens and fields, I have little experience in farming. The closest I ever came to being a farmer is when my folks wanted me to join the Future Farmers of America when I was in the sixth grade and I had to write a very boring paper on soil and erosion in order to meet the requirements. I never went to any meetings or gatherings.

Then it occurred to me that the stories in the magazine wouldn’t have to be about farming per se, but the rural life and the beauty and drama it holds. After all, all stories are first about people then about the genre. People living in rural areas have the same dramas, love stories, hopes, dreams, nightmares, and complex relationships the rest of the world does. So, the magazine would ultimately be about the same plots, but with different settings.

Later, I did a quick search of Google to see what extant magazines deal with fiction set on farms. I found nothing “farm fiction” per se. Then I had another idea and set for “rural” and “fiction”. Apparently, there is such a genre as “rural fiction”, but there doesn’t seem (at least in my quick, superficial scan) a magazine with a title anything like “rural fiction” or even specializing in it, though short rural fiction pops up here and there in various magazines. There seems to be a niche open.

Thus, I have a name for my new project: Rural Fiction Magazine (RFM).

I took a WordPress website that I had that wasn’t going anywhere and changed it rather quickly and completely into Rural Fiction Magazine. I developed a quick business plan and put up a submissions page. I am now hoping and waiting for the first submission. I am also developing a marketing and publicity plan.

Hopefully, I will be able to drum up some community support for RFM and maybe draw in a few community dollars in the form of advertising when that time comes. For now, the only sources of cash flow from this magazine I have at the moment are in the Gifts page and a few affiliate links. I hope to expand on this soon and find other ways to fund this endeavor.

Bottom line: Rural Fiction Magazine is up and running though without any stories or poems. Hopefully, they will come soon as I expand my marketing campaign.

If you dabble in writing mainstream/literary stories and poems (or of any genre) that have a rural setting or concern rural themes, please consider submitting them to RFM. Currently, RFM is not accepting stories of over 5,000 words. There is no pay, but the author does retain all rights. Guidelines are on the website.

10 Short Stories with Great Dialogue That Aren’t “Hills Like White Elephants” — Literary Hub

Before you get excited: I have no problem with “Hills Like White Elephants.” In this classic story, Ernest Hemingway demonstrates a masterful, subtle use of dialogue—so much so that it has become, if not a totally clichéd, then at least a ubiquitous text in creative writing classrooms. I myself encountered it at least four times…

10 Short Stories with Great Dialogue That Aren’t “Hills Like White Elephants” — Literary Hub

Dorothy Parker is back in New York City—with a new and improved tombstone. — Literary Hub

54 years after her death, legendary author and wit Dorothy Parker’s cremated remains have finally been transported from Baltimore, where she was initially buried, to New York City, her primary home—and her tombstone has a new inscription. Parker was never based in Baltimore, but in her will, Parker left her entire estate to Martin Luther…

Dorothy Parker is back in New York City—with a new and improved tombstone. — Literary Hub

Author Interview with Mychea — Write 2 Be Magazine

A native of the Metropolitan of Washington, DC, Mychea holds a Bachelor of Science in Graphic Design and is the author of 11 fiction novels and 2 eBooks, resulting in over half a million book sales. She is also the writer and producer of 3 stage plays and a web series that were filmed in […]

Author Interview with Mychea — Write 2 Be Magazine

10 obras imperdibles de Jorge Luis Borges — El Ciudadano

El Ciudadano El escritor argentino, Jorge Luis Borges, nació en la ciudad de Buenos Aires el 24 de agosto de 1899. Se le considera uno de los autores más destacados y una de las grandes figuras literarias de la lengua española del siglo XX. Durante su infancia, aprendió muy bien inglés gracias a su abuela…

10 obras imperdibles de Jorge Luis Borges — El Ciudadano

The Non-Written Not-Rule on Paragraph Length #Writing #Author #Advice — James Harringtons Creative Work

I wanted to ask you about chapters. I’m heavily into the re-write of mine. I’ve been putting a lot more detail which means some of my chapters have become a lot bigger. In your view what’s the maximum word count for a chapter? Is it okay to have a 3k or even 5k one if […]

The Non-Written Not-Rule on Paragraph Length #Writing #Author #Advice — James Harringtons Creative Work

14 new books to look forward to this week. — Literary Hub

You know what they say: new books are just as good (if not better) than new friends. Okay, maybe they don’t say that. Maybe I made that up. Maybe my dog and I are feeling a little stir crazy, and the only thing we had to look forward to in the midst of the tropical…

14 new books to look forward to this week. — Literary Hub

10 Speculative Fiction Magazines Accepting Submissions NOW – Paying Markets – by Erica Verrillo… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

on Publishing … and Other Forms of Insanity: Here are ten literary magazines currently open to submissions of speculative fiction and poetry. They are seeking a wide variety of subgenres: Cyberpunk, Steampunk, Dark Fantasy, Horror, Fantasy, Magical Realism, Myth, Folklore, Surrealism, Slipstream, and Weird Fiction. All of these are paying markets. Some accept reprints. None […]

10 Speculative Fiction Magazines Accepting Submissions NOW – Paying Markets – by Erica Verrillo… — Chris The Story Reading Ape’s Blog

OPEN Call for SUBMISSIONS: The Sirens Call – Halloween 2021 – issue 55 | #Horror #DarkFiction #eZine #OpenCall #Reprints #fiction #stories #flash #poetry @Sirens_Call — The Sirens Song

#SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN: for the 55th issue of The Sirens Call eZine. We accept short #stories, #flash and micro #fiction, #drabbles, and #poetry that fit the #horror or #dark #fiction genre. Plus, this is the Halloween Issue, so let’s keep it creepy! #darkfic #flashfic #microfic visit sirenscallpub.com for details.

OPEN Call for SUBMISSIONS: The Sirens Call – Halloween 2021 – issue 55 | #Horror #DarkFiction #eZine #OpenCall #Reprints #fiction #stories #flash #poetry @Sirens_Call — The Sirens Song

Orwell’s ideas remain relevant 75 years after ‘Animal Farm’ was published — At the BookShelf

George Orwell’s writings have left a lasting imprint on American thought and culture…

George Orwell’s writings have left a lasting imprint on American thought and culture. ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images Mark Satta, Wayne State University Seventy-five years ago, in August 1946, George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” was published in the United States. It was a huge success, with over a half-million copies sold in its first year. […]

Orwell’s ideas remain relevant 75 years after ‘Animal Farm’ was published — At the BookShelf

Wisdom — words and music and stories

Sara Teasdale was an American lyric poet born in St. Louis, Missouri on 8 August 1884 In 1918, she won the Columbia University Poetry Society Prize for her collection Love Songs.The prize was later officially renamed the Pulitzer Prize. after newspaper publisher Joseph PulitzerWeakened after a difficult bout with pneumonia, she died by suicide in […]

Wisdom — words and music and stories