The Saturday Night Special: “At the Mountains of Madness”, a Short Lovecraft Animation Film

I ran across this on YouTube and thought it would make a good Saturday Night Special. It’s the classic Lovecraft tale and comes via Michele Boticelli. I love watching any of the Lovecraft animation shorts I can find on YouTube. Of course, some are better than others, but to me almost all are very enjoyable. It’s nice to have read a Lovecraft story and then see if someone else envisioned it in the same way.

“A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” is Available on Amazon Kindle

The new cover for A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror as of November 15, 2019.

The new cover for A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror as of November 15, 2019.

My e-book collection of my horror shorts A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” is available on Amazon Kindle.  For your copy, go to my Amazon author’s page (amazon.com/author/philslattery) where you can find links to my other works as well.

In this collection of published and previously unpublished stories of horror, I offer a look into the minds of people who perpetrate horrors, from acts of stupidity with unintended results to cold-hearted revenge to pure enjoyment to complete indifference. Settings range from 17th-century France in the heart of the werewolf trials to the resurrection of the Aztec black arts to a medicine man’s revenge in the Old West to the depths of Hell to mob vengeance and modern day necromancy to sociopathic serial killers and on to alien worlds in the distant future.

Don’t forget to show your appreciation for these tales by leaving a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or other social media.

P.S. Winn gave the collection four stars on Amazon, calling it “Great variety”, and commented: “The author has given readers a fantastic collection of varied horror stories. Short stories, flash fiction and even shorter micro fiction tales are included in a collection that might have readers keeping their lights on. I have read other books by this author and love the writing style and the way his words draw one into the tales.”

Comments on previously published stories (which are only a part of those in this collection) include:

Jay Manning, editor of Midnight Times commented in its Spring, 2006 issue: “Wolfsheim” is basically a traditional horror story that tells the tale of a small European village confronted by the threat of werewolves. If you like stories about lycans, you definitely need to check this one out. Great stuff.”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes A “Tale of Hell” as a “… chilling vision of hell”. Other comments on “A Tale of Hell” from readers of Fiction on the Web:

“An intense and well paced story, cleverly leading the reader up a number of garden paths before Jack’s reality finally clarifies and appears in all its horror. The writing is focused and spare as Jack’s malevolent characteristics and idiosyncrasies manifest themselves…Overall a strong tale that lingers in the imagination…”

“brilliantly descriptive piece on man´s apparently unstoppable descent, literally into hell,…”

” Enjoyed this story. I thought it was nicely written. Started with a familiar vision of hell, but added several unique treatments; kept me interested in how it all would end. Thanks”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes “Dream Warrior” as a “…powerful revenge epic about a man who visits his Mexican grandfather for spiritual guidance after a violent crime results in the death if his fiancée”. Fiction on the Web readers commented:

“quite literally a rite of passage, mystical and with an interesting payoff, one which Miguel may have to reckon with in time. some very good writing and characterisation. well done”

“…this is a rite of passage, complex and rich with significance. The cultural invocations are vivid and intense, the work of a writer in his/her full stride. The future for Miguel, who knows? The readers interest is fully engaged with what is to come…”

“Really enjoyed the story-kept me up past my bedtime reading it!”

“I loved the concept, was fascinated by the almost hallucinatory detail of legend with its fatal shadowlands.”

Reader comments on “Murder by Plastic” include:

“Chilling and brilliantly economical”

“Very well-paced and intriguing”

“Fabulous story! Five stars!”

Follow me using the link on the homepage or check back frequently for updates.

Don’t forget to leave a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or on other social media.

“A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” is Available on Amazon Kindle

The new cover for A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror as of November 15, 2019.

The new cover for A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror as of November 15, 2019.

My e-book collection of my horror shorts A Tale of Hell and Other Works of Horror” is available on Amazon Kindle.  For your copy, go to my Amazon author’s page (amazon.com/author/philslattery) where you can find links to my other works as well.

In this collection of published and previously unpublished stories of horror, I offer a look into the minds of people who perpetrate horrors, from acts of stupidity with unintended results to cold-hearted revenge to pure enjoyment to complete indifference. Settings range from 17th-century France in the heart of the werewolf trials to the resurrection of the Aztec black arts to a medicine man’s revenge in the Old West to the depths of Hell to mob vengeance and modern day necromancy to sociopathic serial killers and on to alien worlds in the distant future.

Don’t forget to show your appreciation for these tales by leaving a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or other social media.

P.S. Winn gave the collection four stars on Amazon, calling it “Great variety”, and commented: “The author has given readers a fantastic collection of varied horror stories. Short stories, flash fiction and even shorter micro fiction tales are included in a collection that might have readers keeping their lights on. I have read other books by this author and love the writing style and the way his words draw one into the tales.”

Comments on previously published stories (which are only a part of those in this collection) include:

Jay Manning, editor of Midnight Times commented in its Spring, 2006 issue: “Wolfsheim” is basically a traditional horror story that tells the tale of a small European village confronted by the threat of werewolves. If you like stories about lycans, you definitely need to check this one out. Great stuff.”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes A “Tale of Hell” as a “… chilling vision of hell”. Other comments on “A Tale of Hell” from readers of Fiction on the Web:

“An intense and well paced story, cleverly leading the reader up a number of garden paths before Jack’s reality finally clarifies and appears in all its horror. The writing is focused and spare as Jack’s malevolent characteristics and idiosyncrasies manifest themselves…Overall a strong tale that lingers in the imagination…”

“brilliantly descriptive piece on man´s apparently unstoppable descent, literally into hell,…”

” Enjoyed this story. I thought it was nicely written. Started with a familiar vision of hell, but added several unique treatments; kept me interested in how it all would end. Thanks”

Publisher Charlie Fish of Fiction on the Web summarizes “Dream Warrior” as a “…powerful revenge epic about a man who visits his Mexican grandfather for spiritual guidance after a violent crime results in the death if his fiancée”. Fiction on the Web readers commented:

“quite literally a rite of passage, mystical and with an interesting payoff, one which Miguel may have to reckon with in time. some very good writing and characterisation. well done”

“…this is a rite of passage, complex and rich with significance. The cultural invocations are vivid and intense, the work of a writer in his/her full stride. The future for Miguel, who knows? The readers interest is fully engaged with what is to come…”

“Really enjoyed the story-kept me up past my bedtime reading it!”

“I loved the concept, was fascinated by the almost hallucinatory detail of legend with its fatal shadowlands.”

Reader comments on “Murder by Plastic” include:

“Chilling and brilliantly economical”

“Very well-paced and intriguing”

“Fabulous story! Five stars!”

Follow me using the link on the homepage or check back frequently for updates.

Don’t forget to leave a review on Amazon, Goodreads, or on other social media.

Marketing Analysis: “Need A Distraction? Read “Embrace The Wild” — Short Story Scribe”

Study the marketing strategy and tactics of this article for a moment, then read my analysis following it.

In these times, reality is getting to us all. Take a little sexual escape into a fantasy world which only Scono Sciuto can conjure. Are these wildly erotic tales based upon many people, or one special muse? Scono has yet to tell. Click the picture below and read a free sample, then hit purchase and […]

via Need A Distraction? Read “Embrace The Wild” — Short Story Scribe

Let me be clear about something right off the bat: I have never read this book and probably never will read it simply because it is in a genre whose books generally don’t appeal to me. That said, I have nothing against this book or its author and, as far as I know, she might be the next Nobel laureate for literature. I just want to take a look at how it’s marketed in this instance. The fact that in spite of its genre it grabbed my attention is what intrigues me.

I strive to make my collections’ covers striking to gain the reader’s attention as he/she is scrolling through Amazon. For that reason I am now leaning toward very dramatic covers like on A Tale of Hell and Other Works of HorrorAnother style I favor is a close-up of a full-color face looking directly at the reader. See the cover of The Scent and Other Stories: The Dark Side of Love. From what I can gather from a few sources, the human mind has evolved to remember faces and their expressions and to pay particular attention to them. So having a cover of a face looking directly at the reader will probably be more memorable and more attention-grabbing than a painting of two lovers looking into each other’s eyes, particularly if the person on the cover is attractive to the reader.

This is what I find interesting about this ad:

  1. Its bright, single color, pink, that is often associated with femininity overwhelms the reader while conveying a single, unstated message: This book is about things feminine. It is a not-so-subtle use of a common symbol that overwhelms the readers as soon as the page is opened.
  2. The titles are in what could be described as a very feminine handwriting, again hitting the reader with the idea of femininity.
  3. The stark contrast in colors, tones, and shades of the woman’s body with the text. However, white is a color used to link the two together. Not only is it used for the headlines and text, but it is also subtly used in the highlights of the woman’s body.
  4. Obviously, the woman is young and beautiful and sexually very attractive to probably a very large percentage of the population whether male or female. The photo is also very teasing as the woman’s hand and arm cover the public area and breasts.
  5. The print of the text is small. So to read it, one has to draw closer to the ad (at least at my age), which, depending on your sexual orientation, may or may not be an unpleasant experience.
  6. If you click on the ad, you will be taken to a sample of the book. Getting the reader hooked into the story with the first few, if not the very first line is crucially important in marketing books.
  7. One one has gone to the sample text, the sample is not brief and gives the reader a good taste of what reading the entire book will be like.
  8. Note this not an ad designed for the Internet, this is the front, spine, and back of the book. This bright pink will definitely make it stand out from all the other books on its shelf, whether the reader can see only the spine and particularly if the reader sees the entire front cover.
  9. All this being said, the one recommendation I have as to how to improve the marketing of this book is to make the print on the spine much larger. As it is, the reader’s attention will not be grabbed by the title “Embrace the Wild Fantasies”, because the print is simply too small to be noticeable, whereas a dramatic title like that would grab anyone’s attention if it can be seen. Likewise, the author’s name should be larger on the spine. Occasionally, I will walk through a bookstore looking over the stacks and asking myself about what makes any one book stand out from the rest, particularly if all I can see of it is the spine, which is what anyone sees of the majority of the books in a bookstore. What I have found is an interesting methodology for publicizing a book when one can see only its spine: if the author is famous, his/her name is in much larger, clearer font than the title. If the author is not well known, the title is in larger, clearer font than the author’s name. I suppose this is because the name of a well-known author will attract the reader, who can then read the title. On the other hand, if an author is not well-known, then it’s up to a dramatic, intriguing title to attract the reader.

Anyway, that’s my analysis for now. Let me know what you think in the comments. Don’t forget to hit the like button and to subscribe to this website. And, for God’s sake, don’t forget to visit my Amazon author’s page and check out the selection of my works.

10 – Benefits of Writing e-Books — Free PLR Articles

Composing e-books can be a more cost effective methods to promote your work while being environmentally friendly at the same time. If you are meaning to go far for yourself as a writer, then possibly composing e-books is something you might like to attempt. If you have had no luck in the pieces you have…

via 10 – Benefits of Writing e-Books — Free PLR Articles

The Quiet American — Thoughts on Papyrus

“Death was the only absolute value in my world. Lose life and one would lose nothing again forever… Death was far more certain than God, and with death there would be no longer the daily possibility of love dying. The nightmare of a future of boredom and indifference would lift. I could never have been […]

via The Quiet American — Thoughts on Papyrus